The shirt will look its best the next time you need to do the same. Need a New Iron? The Rowenta Steamforce DW, $, topped our steam iron tests followed by the Panasonic NI-WA, $

Quick Summary If you need to iron a dress shirt, lay the collar flat on the ironing board and press a hot iron from the points of the collar inward to the back of the neck, then turn the shirt over and repeat for the other side. Reposition for the opposite shoulder.

Before you can iron your shirts, you need to wash them properly. Wash dress shirts in a separate load on the gentle cycle, and hang to dry on hangers with the collar buttons closed. Do not put them in the dryer, as this will wear them out and possibly shrink them.
Martha Stewart teaches actor Doug Savant how to correctly iron a shirt, the 17th thing everyone should know how to do. New This Month. Food. Appetizers. Breakfast & Brunch Recipes The Proper Way to Iron a Dress Shirt. Facebook Comment MORE.
Shirts. Ironing shirts is quicker and easier than you might think. Like T.M. Lewin says in the video above, it should only take an average of three minutes to properly iron a shirt, and that's.
Shirts. Ironing shirts is quicker and easier than you might think. Like T.M. Lewin says in the video above, it should only take an average of three minutes to properly iron a shirt, and that's.
Martha Stewart teaches actor Doug Savant how to correctly iron a shirt, the 17th thing everyone should know how to do. New This Month. Food. Appetizers. Breakfast & Brunch Recipes The Proper Way to Iron a Dress Shirt. Facebook Comment MORE.
Our expert tips and tricks will get you out the door in no time

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When ironing a dress shirt sleeve, it is easiest to line up the bottom seam of the sleeve and press it from the seam to the top of the shirt using firm pressure. If the iron is hot enough and the shirt is slightly damp, you will end up with a beautiful crease at the top of the sleeve, opposite of the sleeve’s seam.

You want to make sure that it's sharp. Start at the tips and move the iron inward. This will help avoid creating a wrinkle at the edge of the collar. Apply steam and pressure, leaning down on the shirt, rather than simply waving the iron around over it.

The yoke is the piece that spans the shoulders. Lay this flat and press down. Don't worry if you create a crease across the back, you can flatten that out later. Start by laying the sleeve flat on your board, with the underarm seam in a clean line.

For an old school look, press a tight crease in the sleeve opposite the seam. If you don't like a crease, simply don't press too hard at the folded edge. Next lay the cuff out flat and press hard, moving from the edge inward as you did with the collar.

Next, position a section of the shirt body on the corner of your board and press flat. Press tight down across the seams for a clean look. If you want you can also fold the collar down and iron in a bit of a crease at the front of the collar so that it will angle down sharply.

Finally, do the front of the shirt. Do one side at a time. Be careful of the buttons. Use the point of the iron to get in the areas up around the front of the collar. If the dress shirt has a pocket, this can be tricky.

You can be trickier. As you push the iron down on one side you can pull gently on the other to keep things tight and straight.

It will make ironing much easier. Lay the sleeve out on the board. With the rest of the shirt off to the side, lay out the sleeve on the ironing board. The cuff should be at the narrow end of the board. Lay it as flat as possible, button-side of the cuff down, and smooth it out by hand.

Starting with the seam on the underside of the sleeve the one that leads into the armpit , flatten the sleeve from the point until another "seam" is created on the other side. Spray the starch on the sleeve. Get some spray starch or sizing and spray it onto the whole sleeve, following the directions on the can. Iron the sleeve, starting from the shoulder and working down until about 3" from the beginning of the cuff.

Be careful to avoid ironing over the buttons underneath. If you want to avoid the creased look, stop just short of the edges.

Do a quarter turn on the sleeve before doing the other side and iron the new center to avoid wrinkles that you would have missed at the edge. There are a number of different ways to do this. Because off the little gathers and pleats at the cuff of dress shirts, this can be a very difficult area to iron.

How you do it will depend on how much effort you want to put in and how dramatic the gathers and pleats on the cuff are. You can simply iron the bottom of the sleeve and the cuff in small sections, if you want to save time and don't care too much about how it looks.

Spread the pleats and gathers by hand and iron You can roll up the hand towel into a tight roll roughly the same size as your wrist and place it in the cuff. Iron with this in place to avoid much of the difficulty of ironing this area. If the pleats and gathers are very badly wrinkled, ball up the hand towel and stuff in down the sleeve so that it fills out the area as much as possible.

Use the steam function to ease most of the wrinkles and then iron it as much as you can. Flip it over and iron the other side. This should be done in the exact same way as the first side, but should require less effort. Iron the collar by flipping it up spraying with starch, and ironing the wrong side and then the right side. Finish by folding it desired position and ironing the crease. Iron the rest of the shirt. Iron the rest of the shirt, moving from the front panel on one side to the front panel on the opposite side.

Start With The Right Equipment

Within 5 minutes the iron should be ready and all the shirts moistened. Pull the lightest weight shirt from the bag first, making sure it is evenly wet. If not, spray on a bit more water. 1. Iron the Collar First. Always start by ironing your dress shirt collar. The shirt will look its best the next time you need to do the same. Need a New Iron? The Rowenta Steamforce DW, $, topped our steam iron tests followed by the Panasonic NI-WA, $ When ironing a dress shirt sleeve, it is easiest to line up the bottom seam of the sleeve and press it from the seam to the top of the shirt using firm pressure. If the iron is hot enough and the shirt is slightly damp, you will end up with a beautiful crease at the top of the sleeve, opposite of the sleeve’s seam.